Tombstone Tuesday: Eula (Brooks) Binns

Gravemarker of Eula L Binns, buried in Oakland Cemetery in Monticello, Arkansas. Date taken unknown. Photo is privately held by Eula Binns' granddaughter, Barbara (Binns) Smith of Fort Smith, Arkansas. Photo was scanned and digitized by Ginger R Smith, November 2008.

Eula L “Pert” (Brooks) Binns was my great-great grandmother. She was born April 12, 1873 in Monticello, Arkansas and died November 3 1942 in Monticello, Arkansas, just one week shy of her 50th wedding anniversary. She married John Milton Binns November 10, 1892.
Pert Brooks was the daughter of Colonel Iverson L Brooks from Caswell County, North Carolina and his wife Elizabeth “Bettie” Lee of Tennessee. She had lived in Monticello her entire life.

My first trip to the Southern Historical Collection at UNC

This weekend I visited the Southern Historical Collection located on the 4th floor of the Wilson Library at UNC.  I checked out a box from the William S. Powell Papers. This was my first visit to the Collection library. I was allowed to bring my laptop and digital camera in, but had to use the loose leaf paper and pencils they provided to me. They do not provide photocopying services, and if I had not had digital camera, I would have been able to check one of theirs out for free. The only two conditions to using digital cameras were 1) I cannot use a flash and 2) I had to sign a form that said I would not reproduce any images I photographed without the written permission from the Southern Historical Collection.

The purpose of my trip was to find the research notes of William S. Powell that he used in writing his book, “When the Past Refused to Die: The History of Caswell Count, North Carolina.” On page 71, he mentioned my ancestor, “Colonel Henry Williams” as a Revolutionary War soldier and I would like to know what source Powell used to indicate that my ancestor was a Colonel or that he was a Revolutionary War soldier. I have blogged previously here and here that I can’t find any other documentation that he was a Colonel or participated in the Revolutionary War.

The box I reviewed had 5 folders in it which were not named or numbered. As I took a folder out, I had to insert a placeholder in its place. The first folder had printed pages from the book with some corrections Powell made. The 2nd and 3rd folder had correspondence Powell had with his publisher, the Caswell County Historical Association members, and Caswell County residents, just to name a few.  I found a few index cards with notations made of other collections titles that Powell reviewed (although he did not list the repository – whether they were contained in the Southern Historical Collection, the Duke Manuscripts, or North Carolina State Archives, for example), but no reference to any Revolutionary War Records.

In one of his letters to his publisher, Powell mentioned that he had indexed every name and place title he found in each record he reviewed on index cards. These cards were not included with these materials. Maybe he sent these cards to his publisher?

I learned a lot about writing a North Carolina history book from reading Powell’s correspondence.  I learned about the administrative practices of securing an agreement with a publisher and securing funds. I learned about feasibility and finding enough subject material to write about. I learned about how to get the county residents involved and soliciting submissions for historical essays on the history of places like churches, mills, houses, and schools.  I also found in his papers a guide that was written about how to write a county history including a list of subject matter and outline material!  I also saw some correspondence Powell had with people who disagreed with the information he wrote about their ancestors. This gave me great insight into what it would be like to write a historical book, which is something I would like to do someday!

So all in all, my trip was good. I would love to do more research in the Southern Historical Collection. I found their online finding aids to be very information and specific enough to determine if a collection is what I am looking for. Although I did not find exactly what I was looking for, I will not lose hope.

Funeral Card Friday: John Brooks BINNS

John B Binns Rememberance Card

Funeral card of John Brooks Binns, Fort Smith, Arkansas, citing services on 12 December 1989; Privately held by daughter of the deceased, Barbara Jo (Binns) Smith, Fort Smith, Arkansas, scanned by Barbara

John Brooks Binns was my Paternal great-grandfather. He was tall and skinny and had blonde hair and blue eyes. He was married to the love of his life, Blanche Kathryn Hill and they had three beautiful little girls, Kitty, Barbara, and Brooxine Binns. John was a member of the Big 3 Little 3 Press Association in college and played football for the Monticello A&M Bollwevils in Arkansas. He was a meat cutter for Krogers grocery for ten years and when his kids were old enough to go to high school he and his wife went back to school and became school teachers. He taught 5th grade until he retired in 1975.

This post is part of a Monthly First Friday blogging theme suggested by Dee Akard Welborn. Dee encourages geneabloggers to highlight our funeral card collections on the first Friday of each month. You can join the fun on Facebook here as well!

Henry Williams’ Role in the NC Militia During the Revolutionary War

Last year I wrote a postabout my ancestor Henry Williams, asking the question, Was he really a Revolutionary War Soldier? like William S. Powell indicated in his book When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1977 (Durham, NC: Moore Publishing Company, 1977).

Although Powell did not provide sources in his book, he did note that he donated all research materials to the Gunn Memorial Library in Yanceyville, NC. I called the Library and they said they did not have any of Powell’s papers, but that they were probably located at UNC’s Wilson Library. The Finding Aid for Powell’s papers that are housed at the Wilson Library does mention papers relating to Caswell County History, but offers no specifics.

In the meantime, I happened to come upon the “Compiled service records of soldiers who served in the American Army during the Revolutionary war” – a set of microfilm put out by NARA that was scanned and digitized and put online for free public access on the Internet Archives website and can be downloaded for free here.

Henry Williams Service Card Front Page

Henry Williams Receipt Roll

Henry Williams Company Pay Roll

I downloaded 3 pages total.
The first page was the front of Henry Williams’ service card.
It had the following information on it:
Henry Williams
Collier’s Regiment
North Carolina Militia
(Revolutionary War)
Private | Private
Card Numbers:’
1. 37119798
2. 450594
Number of personal papers herein: 0

———————————–
Page 2:

W | Collier’s Regiment | N.C. Militia
Henry Williams
Appears on a Receipt Roll
under the following heading:
“Rec’d of Captin John Johnston specia tickets in
pay for the under Named for serving one Tour of
Duty under his Comand on the 16th of Decem.
1780 Discharged”
(Revolutionary War)
Roll Dated
July the 29th 1783
Remarks:
Number of Record: 1
W P Riply, Copyist

———————————–
Page 3:

W | Collier’s Regiment | N.C. Militia
Henry Williams
PW , Capt. John Johnstone’s Co. in Col.
John Collier’s Reg’t of No. Carolina
Militia, commanded by John Butler, Brigadier General.
(Revolutionary War)
Appears on
Company Pay Roll
of the organization named above,
dated: Dec 22, 1780
What time paid from Sept 8, 17__
What time paid to Dec 22, 17__
Number of Days 106
Pay per day in dollars 1
Subsistence per month 20
Total amount in dollars 176
Remarks:
Shannon Copyist
———————————–

And then another researcher I’ve been working with found the following on footnote.com – a scan of the Pay Receipt that included Henry Williams, a Private, no. 16 down on the left hand side.

Pay Roll for Capt John Johnstone’s Company

Pay Roll for Capt John Johnstone’s Company in John Collin’s Regiment of No. Carolina Militia Commanded by John Butler Brigadier General December 22, 1780.
No: 16
Name: Henry Williams
Rank: Pvt
What Time Paid from: 8 Sept
What Time Paid to: 22 Dec
Number of Days: 106
Pay per day in Dollars: 1
Subsistence per month: 20
Total amount in dollars: 176

———————————–

The existence of these documents is a good indication that our Henry Williams was a participant in the Revolutionary War, however, Powell’s book said he was a “Colonel” and these documents mention only a “Private” Henry Williams, so there is unfortunately some discrepancy.

I guess the hunt for Powell’s original source materials will continue. The Powell collection that is housed at the Wilson Library is huge. According to the finding aid, materials on Caswell County are in folders 121 and 16. I plan to peruse these folders in the new few weeks.

Tombstone Tuesday: John Milton Binns

Gravemarker of John Milton Binns, buried in Oakland Cemetery in Monticello, Arkansas. Photo includes his son John Brooks Binns, date taken unknown. Photo is privately held by John Milton Binns' granddaughter, Barbara (Binns) Smith of Fort Smith, Arkansas. Photo was scanned and digitized by Ginger R Smith, November 2008.

John Milton Binns was my great-great grandfather. He was born January 17, 1868 in Arkansas and died October 8, 1961 in his home in Monticello, Arkansas. He married Perthinia Brooks November 10, 1892. She died November 3, 1942, just one week before they were to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

The Will of Ann Brooks, Caswell County, North Carolina, 1808

Ann Brooks was the wife of Richard Brooks.  She was probably actually the second wife of Richard Brooks.  She was mentioned in his will, written 1789.  You can read more about Richard and Ann Brooks here. It is quite possible her maiden name was “Armistead” and that her daughter, Frances Armistead Brooks was named after Ann’s father.
The following will was obtained from the North Carolina State Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina.  For more information on locating wills and ordering copies from the North Carolina State Archives, please reference my Looking for Wills at the North Carolina State Archives – Updated post.

The following will was found in the Caswell County Series of Original Wills, (dates), box no. 1
Call no. 020.801.1

Summary of Will:

Written: March 4, 1806

To Grand Children:

Six Children of Ann’s son William Bird Brooks:
John, Robert, and William Brooks

Betsy, Ann and Joanna Brooks

Three Children of Ann’s daughter Frances A Sheppard:

Ann, Betsy and Polley Sheppard

Executor:  Son William Bird Brooks
Witnesses: Sol[omon] Graves, S. Graves, John L. Graves

The sale of Ann Brooks’ estate was held in February of 1808. Many of the articles in her estate were purchased by William B. and Jonathan Brooks.

Papers of her estate can be found at the North Carolina State Archives in the Caswell County Original Estate files, C. R. 020.508.8 Ann Brooks. 1808.

Original Scanned Images:

 

Transcript of Will:

In the name of God Amen – I Ann Brooks of the County of Caswell and State of North Carolina – on this 4th of March 1806 – being in perfect mind, health and memory thanks be given unto the Supreme being for the same calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing it is once appointed for all men to die, recommending my spirit to God who gave it, and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian-like burial at the discretion of my Executors; nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again through Christ, and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it pleased God to bless me with in life I give demise and despose of the same in the following manner -

To Wit. I give to William B. Brooke’s son Jno my young  Sorrell Mare at my death Item I give the resideue of my estate to my nine grand children Viz. William B. Brooks’s sons John Robert and William and daughters Betsey, Ann, and Joanna, and Frances A. Shepard’s daughters Ann Betsey and Polly to be equally divided at my death and my three granddaughters Ann Betsey and Polly Shepard equal parts to remain in the hands of my Executor until they marry or arise to lawful age and then paid by my Executor to them as they come of lawful age or marry.
Lastly I constitute and appoint my beloved son William B. Brooks the whole and Sole Executor of this my last will and Testament – revoking and annulling all other wills and testaments heretofore made by me and declaring this to be my last will and testament in witness whereof I Ann Brooks doth set my hand and affix my seal the day and year above within signed and sealed in the presence of

Sol Graves (Jurat)
S. Graves Jr
John L. Graves
Ann Brookes(sealed)

Caswell County Lawful court 1808
The Executor of this will was duly proved in open court by the oath of Solomon Graves Esquire one of the subscribing witnesses thereto and on Motion ordered to be recorded. At the same time William B. Brooks qualified Executor.
Test A Murphey CC
Recorded Book E folio 379
Test A Murphey CC


Wordless Wednesday – Parents Wedding

My Parents Wedding Photo

Tim Smith and Marilyn Godwin were married in Poteau, OK.


This post is part of the daily blogging theme hosted by GeneaBloggers.

Wordless Wednesday – Paternal Grandmother Wedding Shot

My grandmother's (Barbara Jo Binns) wedding photo (Fort Smith, AR)

Barbara Jo Binns married Darrel Smith, December 30, 1956 at Midland Boulevard Church of Christ in Fort Smith, Arkansas. They were both eighteen years old.


This post is part of the daily blogging theme hosted by GeneaBloggers.

Tombstone Tuesday – Burwell Binns

Gravemarker of Burwell and Lucinda (Phelps) Binns who are buried in Buelah Cemetery in Monticello, Drew Co., AR. Photo taken by James Lamar Baker, date unknown, sent to me by Pat Sheldon (Pat and James are both descendants of Burwell and Lucinda

Burwell Binns was born Dec. 6, 1811 in GA and died Jan. 1, 1866 in Veasey, Drew Co., AR. Lucinda Phelps was born Oct. 22, 1818 in GA and died Feb. 16, 1870 in Veasey, Drew Co., AR.

This post is part of the daily blogging theme hosted by GeneaBloggers.

Wordless Wednesday – Paternal Grandfather

My paternal grandfather, Darrel Smith, Airforce, 1956

My Grandfather graduated from Fort Smith High School (Fort Smith, Arkansas) in June 1956. One week later, he went to Little Rock, Arkansas to be inducted into the Air Force. Later that year he became engaged to my grandmother, Barbara Binns. He was 18 years old in this photograph

This post is part of the daily blogging theme hosted by GeneaBloggers.

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