1790 Caswell Co NC Census – Williams

1790 Caswell County, North Carolina Census Report

There were 10 WILLIAMS families listed on this report. At the time of this post, the 1790 images were not available to view online at ancestry.com.

Name and Film No. information:

Bennett Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 82; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Col Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 82; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Daniel Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 82; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Elizabeth Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 82; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Jacob Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 81; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
James Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 79; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Jerremiah Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 82; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
John Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 82; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Thomas Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 83; Family History Library Film: 0568147.
Tobias Williams Roll: M637_7; Page: 83; Family History Library Film: 0568147.

Henry Williams – A Revolutionary War Soldier?

Many researchers of my Henry Williams have indicated that he was a Colonel in the Revolutionary War, citing page 71 of William S. Powell’s book When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1977  (Durham, NC: Moore Publishing Company, 1977) as their source. This is the only source I can find indicating that Henry Williams was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  I did not find a pension application for him or his widow or heirs in Heritage Quest’s Revolutionary War database.

Maybe Henry Williams was in the Caswell County militia and maybe he was active in that militia during the Regulator Movement (of which William S. Powell also wrote a book about – The regulators in North Carolina: a documentary history, 1759-1776).  However, I do not believe he saw duty during the Revolutionary War.  His brother, Colonel James Williams, was instrumental in the War.  He was living in the 96th District of South Carolina at the time.  In 1780, James Williams travelled to Caswell County, NC to visit his brother. It was there he wrote his will and transferred much of his property and possibly his slaves to his brother’s house for safe-keeping from the Tories. That Henry Williams was at home with his family, instead of away at war also indicates to me that he did not participate in the War.

After James’ death during the Battle of King’s Mountain in October 1780, Henry Williams, his brother and executor of his estate, reported an accounting of $25,000 that had been given to his brother, James Williams from the State of North Carolina to use to raise militia in Caswell County and surrounding counties to fight against the Tories. James’ son John Williams testified that this money was used to rally troops who were taken to King’s Mountain with him.  There is no mention of Henry Williams’ active participation in the rallying or marching of said troops. [Source: Graves, William T., James Williams: An American Patriot in the Carolina Backcountry, San Jose: Writers Club Press, 2002, p. 56]

The Author, William S. Powell, did not provide any sources or a bibliography to his book aforementioned. He did, however, note that all notes, chapter materials, and source material was given to the Gunn Memorial Library in Yanceyville, NC.  I therefore intend to visit this library and review his notes to see what source he used for his list of Caswell men who saw action in the Revolutionary War.

Update

The Will of Daniel Williams, Granville Co., NC (1759)

Here is the will of Daniel Williams of Granville Co., NC. Daniel Williams was married to Ursula Henderson. They were the parents of my Henry Williams of Caswell Co., NC. I found two other Williams wills in Granville Co but I am not sure how they connect if at all to my Daniel Williams family. They are William Williams and Thomas Williams.

Williams, Daniel–wills to wife 3 negroes loaned to her for her lifetime, 12 cattle, one horse, feather bed and furniture, household goods, which I do not give away herafter, and at her death to be equally divided between my seven children: Merya Goodman, Henry Williams, John Williams, James Williams, Joseph Williams, Mary Mitchell, Daniel Williams; to my son-in-law Benjamin Goodman, 200 acres of landing being the land whereon he now lives at Capt. Mitchells line; to son John Williams, 350 acres which I purchased of Richard Bullock; to sons James and Joseph Williams, 800 acres of land in Halifax county, Virginia to be equally divided between them; to son Daniel Williams, 400 acres being land and plantation whereon I now live; to daughter Marya Goodman, for her lfietime, 3 negroes and, at her death, to go to her children; to son Henry Williams, 2 negroes and the use of a mullatto fellow to serve to age 21 years; to son John, 3 n3groes; to son James, 3 negroes; to daughter Mary Mitchell, 4 negroes; to son Daniel, 4 negroes; to my wife Ursula William, I lend for her lifetime 6 sheep, 12 hogs and, at her death, to be divided to my seven children; to my youngest children, James, Joseph, Mary Mitchell, and Daniel Williams, all rest of cattle, sheep, and hogs to divide between them; to son James, a horse and a feather bed and furniture; to son Joseph, a stallion, a feather bed and furniture; to daughter Mary Mitchell, a horse; to son Daniel Williams a horse and a mare, a feather bed and furniture; to son James Williams, land on Anderson swamp containing 400 acres; to son Joseph, land on Hico road and branches of Island creek—400 acres; my executors are to sell my crop of tobacco and pay my debts and to get 8000 ten penny nails and 8000 eight penny nails and give them to James and Joseph Williams and whereas Henry Williams and Marya Goodman have had pewter bought for them, it is my desire that John, James, Joseph, Mary Mitchell, and Daniel are to have pewter bought for them in equal amount by my executors and if any surplus from these sale, to be divided in eight parts for my wife and children; after wife’s death, all that is left to be divided to them.Exrs: my wife, Ursula Williams, John and James Williams

Wts: Luke Waldrup, William Sims

Source: Abstracts Of Granville County, NC, Unrecorded wills, 1746-1771, by Zae Gwynn
Page 64–Nov. 15, 1759–proved Dec. court 1759

WILLIAMS family, Granville Co., NC

Today I combed through the Granville Co., NC usgenweb files looking for information on the Williams family. My ancestor, Henry Williams, was not from Granville Co.; he was from Caswell Co., NC. However, his father, Daniel Williams lived in Granville Co., NC along with many of Henry’s siblings.

Here is what I found:

  • Marriage record of Charles Williams to Hannah Clewall, 23 Feb 1797; This Charles Williams was probably a son of William Williams and is mentioned in his will.
  • Revolutionary War Pension files for Samuel F. Williams, son of William Williams, and Solomon Williams.
  • History of Granville Co., NC including Judge Henderson and John Williams. This Williams – Henderson connection intrigued me because Daniel Williams married Ursula Henderson.
  • Orphan accounts of Granville Co., NC: Elinor Armsby to Daniel and Ursula Williams to learn housewifery, 22 Mar 1759; Samuel Wheeler to James Williams to learn carpentry, 21 Mar 1758.

All of this information was copied and saved to my “Daniel Williams.doc” file.

WILLIAMS family, Lunenburg Co., VA

In 1757, Daniel Williams, planter, of Granville Co., NC deeded a tract of land consisting of 420 acres in Lunenburg Co., VA to his son, Henry Williams “for love and affection.” Henry and his wife Elizabeth lived in Lunenburg Co., VA through 1762. In 1764 Lunenburg Co was divided to form Mecklenburg Co., VA in the south. Henry and Elizabeth Williams were then listed as living in Mecklenburg Co., VA between 1765-1770; therefore this land must have laid in the area that was originally Lunenburg that became Mecklenburg Co., VA in 1764. The Willliams family removed to Orange Co., NC, then Caswell Co., NC about 1770.

Today I searched for Henry Williams in the USGenWeb Lunenburg Co., VA archive files for deeds and court records. Although I did not find any references to Henry Williams, my ancestor, I did find a family record file of Reverend John Williams, that was submitted by JoLee Gregory Spears. Reverend John Williams of Lunenburg Co., VA was a 1st cousin of my ancestor, Henry Williams.

JoLee’s family record contained a link to Reverend John Williams and Henry Williams’ grandfather, John Williams, the Wealthy Welshman published by Scott K. Williams.

This website was a wealth of information regarding the history of the Williams Family in America. Scott K. Williams’ two significant references were the following:

1) “Williams 300 Years of Leadership in America: A History of the Descendants of John Williams of Llangollen, Wales” by Lewis James Williams, 1997. This book can be found at the State Library of North Carolina.

2) The transcript of the Williams Family Bible written by John Drayton Williams, son of Washington Williams, grandson of Gen. James Williams; In 1910 Barbara A. McClung copied John D. Williams’ family bible that he wrote in 1845 which she borrowed from William D. Williams, Jr (Greenville, TN). If I’m not mistaking, this transcription by Barbara A. McClung is housed in the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection at the Knox Co., TN Library and is copied in several rootsweb files online.

I am very excited about all the great publications references I have come across this week on my Williams family. Now I just have to find enough records to prove that Henry Williams is really my ancestor!!! I’m not sure of what the genealogy netiquette of saying this is, but proving that Henry Williams’ daughter, Susannah Williams Brooks Rice was married to Christopher Brooks, and that they were the parents of my ancestor, Christopher Williams Brooks, would disprove existing publications listing George Brooks as C W’s father.

With a little help from my new-found friend in TN, I hope to solve this mystery soon.

James WILLIAMS, 96th District, SC (con't)

Another To Do:

1. Read Williams Graves’ “James Williams, An American Patriot in the Carolina Backcountry”; 2002.

2. Copy the following article which can be found at the NC Genealogy Library (or the Olivia Raney History Library – closed stacks): Madge C. Frink. “Colonel James Williams: A Sketch of a Patriot and the Events Leading to the Battle of King’s Mountain.” Daughter’s of the American Revolution Magazine 118 (1984): 644-6.

Update: I could not find this article by Madge C. Frink in volume 118. This source has been cited for other family pages, so this is kind of strange. I did find another volume with an article about James Williams, but MY LIBRARY IS MISSING THAT VOLUME.

Too bad I can’t remember where I saw this source cited. I guess I need to keep better blogs :)

James WILLIAMS, 96th District, SC

In my previous post, I mentioned that my ancestor, Henry Williams of Caswell Co., NC had a brother, Colonel James Williams of the 96th District, SC who died in the Revolutionary War. I received the book I ordered “James Williams: An American Patriot in the Carolina Backcountry” by William Graves in the mail this week to confirm this relationship. Graves’ book gives an excellent account of the life of Colonel James Williams and includes familial activities and history based on primary sources of letters, wills, estate, and court records.

The author of this book confirms that my ancestor, Henry Williams, was in deed the brother of Colonel James Williams and says that Colonel James Williams transferred much of his assets, including his slaves, to his brother’s house for safe keeping from the Tories shortly before he died (p. 25-27).

Details of his whole estate were recorded in both Caswell Co., NC and in the 96th District, SC. This was a great find. As a side, my ancestor, Henry Williams, was also a Colonel in the Revolutionary War; Henry Williams’ great-grandson, Iverson Lea Brooks later became a General in the War between the States.

To Do:

  1. Copy the Will of James Williams from the Caswell Co., NC Will folders at the State Archives [If not located, look for will recorded in Caswell Co Will Book A, p. 113, December Court 1780]
  2. Copy the estate files of James Williams from the loose papers in the estate of James in Caswell Co., NC at the State Archives
  3. Go through and index the Land Grants issued the Williams family in Granville Co., NC before 1800. - Updated: A summary of Land Grants was posted here.

James Williams of the 96th District, South Carolina, con’t

WILLIAMS family (Caswell Co., NC)

Last week I combed through some more WILLIAMS family entries in Katherine Kerr Kendall’s Abstract of Caswell County, NC Will Books, 1777-1843 that is posted online at ancestry.com. I found some correlations between my Henry Williams and his brother James Williams. Henry Williams administered the estate of James Williams who wrote his will in 1780 in Caswell Co., NC, having sought refuge from his home town of 96th District, SC.
Evidently this James Williams was a pretty famous Colonel in the Revolutionary War. Colonel James Williams died at the battle of King’s Mountain, Oct 1780 and is buried in Gaffney, SC.
I ordered the book “James Williams: An American Patriot in the Carolina Backcountry” by William Graves hoping to learn more about his family to see if he really was a brother to my Henry Williams.

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